Show Side Menu

Prescriptions

We now offer the facility to book appointments along with the opportunity to view and order repeat prescriptions online.  You can also request access to your Summary Care record and to your coded record.

In order for you to use these functions, login details must first be obtained through the receptionist at the surgery.

Click here for more information about the features you can use on the online services.

Please note that unless you are a patient that is known to be housebound you will be required to attend the surgery in person and you will be requested to show photo ID.

There is also an app available to download

Electronic transfer of prescriptions

From 5th November 2018, pharmacies will no longer be able to order medications on your behalf.

You will need to order medication via one of three ways:

  1. Online GP repeat ordering services (SystmOnline)
  2. Visit the practice and order in person
  3. Post repeats prescription request to the practice.

Exemptions will be made for certain vulnerable patients. If you feel you are particularly vulnerable and will not be able to order your medication via one of the three above routes, you may ask the Patient Services Team or download the exemption form here. Please note the GP will consider each exemption form on a patient-by-patient basis.

The doctor may raise a repeat prescription for medication you need to take regularly. To order more medication, please hand the white slip into reception at least 72 working hours. We also accept requests by post and fax or online but not over the telephone as this increases the risk of mistakes being made. We can post prescriptions to you if you provide a stamped addressed envelope. 

Why do we need 72 hours?
We want to make sure you stay well on your medication, so from time to time we need to review it. The 72 hours allows us to do this so you do not have to make an appointment to see the doctor or nurse, therefore saving you time. We're sorry we cannot offer a while-you-wait service.

If you pay for your prescriptions and are on several different medications, it may be more cost effective to buy a pre-payment certificate. Ask your local pharmacy for an application form.

Why is the medication I want to order not on my repeat slip?
If a medication is not on the repeat slip it may be either because it is new or because it is only meant to be taken as a one-off course. It will need to be checked by a doctor before it is issued again. This is usually done without an appointment. Sometimes a doctor may ask you to make a telephone appointment before that medication is reissued to check that there are no side effects or that it has been effective.

Why have I been asked to make an appointment?
Some medications, or the conditions we are treating you for, need regular monitoring eg blood tests or blood pressure checks. If you are on a number of medications, you may be asked to see a doctor or clinical pharmacist for a more detailed review to ensure you are on the best combination of treatments.

Why can I not order medications over the phone?
Some medications have similar names or are used in different doses for different conditions or by different people. We ask for medication requests to be in writing to prevent mistakes occurring. You will need Login details to access our online services which you can obtain at our reception desk. You will be required to show ID unless you are housebound, in which case the forms can be sent to your home address.

Guidance from NHS England has been published asking GPs not to normally prescribe medicines which can be bought over the counter. This guidance applies to all patients, including those who would be exempt from paying the prescription charge.

Why has this guidance been developed?
In the year prior to June 2017, the NHS spent approximately £569 million on prescriptions for medicines, which could otherwise be purchased over the counter (OTC) from a pharmacy and/or other outlets such as petrol stations or supermarkets.

These prescriptions include items for a condition:

  • That is considered to be self-limiting and so does not need treatment as it will heal or be cured of its own accord;
  • Which lends itself to self-care i.e. the person suffering does not normally need to seek medical advice and can manage the condition by purchasing OTC items directly

The costs to the NHS for many of the items used to treat minor conditions are often higher than the prices for which they can be purchased over the counter as there are hidden costs. For example, a pack of 12 anti-sickness tablets can be purchased for £2.18 from a pharmacy whereas the cost to the NHS is over £3.00 after including dispensing fees. The actual total cost for the NHS is over £35 when you include GP consultation and other administration costs.

More cost-effective use of stretched NHS resources allows money to be spent where it is most needed, whilst improving patient outcomes. As an example, every £1m saved on prescriptions for over the counter treatments could fund (approx.):

  • 39 more community nurses; or
  • 270 more hip replacements; or
  • 66 more drug treatment courses for breast cancer; or
  • 1000 more drug treatment courses for Alzheimer’s; or
  • 1040 more cataract operations.

If you are no longer prescribing over-the-counter medicines, where can I get these medicines from?
Medicines can be purchased from community pharmacies and / or supermarkets. These often have long opening times so you can get your medicines quickly and treat your condition early, rather than having to wait for a GP appointment. This also saves valuable GP time and your own time too – it is much quicker to pop into your local pharmacy than wait for a GP appointment.

The range of medicines available to buy is increasing and community pharmacists are experts who are best placed to give advice on the right product for you to use. You may find it helpful to keep a small supply of medicines at home for use, such as painkillers for headaches and remedies for colds and sore throats.

The NHS website also contains a lot of useful information on a range of minor ailments (such as constipation, short-term pain, strains and sprains), which you can manage yourself. Please visit www.nhs.uk.

If your problem is more serious and needs the attention of a GP, your pharmacist will recognise this and advise you to see your GP.

I am being treated with these medicines for a long-term condition and taking them regularly, do I need to buy them?
People who need medicines for a long-term condition will still be able to get them with a prescription. This policy only applies to the use of medicines and products for short-term conditions. Your GP will continue to prescribe items you need for your long-term condition.

For example: Paracetamol for short-term pain relief and headaches should be purchased. Paracetamol used in the long-term management of chronic pain needing two tablets four times a day regularly, may be prescribed.

I have been to my pharmacist to buy a particular type of medicine but they will not sell it to me. What do I do?
There are some circumstances when pharmacists might not sell you a medicine. For
example:

  • When a product is not licensed for sale for your intended use
  • When a product is not appropriate for you, or could cause you harm
  • There are restrictions on the amount that can be sold and you are asking for too much of the product

If this happens, please speak to your GP and if they think you still need the item, they may issue you with a prescription at their clinical discretion.

I have tried self-care with an OTC product but it has not helped. What should I do?
Please contact out patient services team who will arrange a GP or Nurse to call you or book an appointment.

If you have symptoms that suggest the condition is not minor e.g. indigestion with severe pain please contact the surgery.

Useful websites:

Local Help Finder: www.sussexhelpmy.nhs.uk
Self-Care Advice: www.selfcareforum.org
NHS Website: www.nhs.uk

Download
OTC Summary Card
OTC 2018 Policy

 

Your Neighbourhood Professionals. Just a Click Away! In receipt of the Mobility allowance? You may be entitled to a brand new car even if you cannot drive yourself. Contact a local motability garage today. The Little Wellbeing Room L Hawkins & Sons Funeral Directors
Woodlands Partnership - Tilgate Way, Tilgate, Crawley, West Sussex, RH10 5BW
Clerklands Surgery - Vicarage Lane, Horley, Surrey, RH6 8AR
Website supplied by Oldroyd Publishing Group
Your Neighbourhood Professionals. Just a Click Away! In receipt of the Mobility allowance? You may be entitled to a brand new car even if you cannot drive yourself. Contact a local motability garage today. The Little Wellbeing Room L Hawkins & Sons Funeral Directors
Back to top